SUPERIOR BEING: STARDUST BY JAROSLAW GOGOLIN

Written by Jaroslaw Gogolin / Reviewed by Riya Saha

This is the 4th part of the Superior Being series (screenplays). “Through our eyes, the universe is perceiving itself. Through our ears, the universe is listening to its harmonies. We are the witnesses through which the universe becomes conscious of its glory, of its magnificence. You are the aperture through which the universe is looking at and exploring itself.” – Alan Watts

The vital point of writing a  script is detailing, it is said that the script comprises of everything that the actor, directors, producer, and others involved in the film making can think of. And certainly Superior Being: Stardust is a perfect example of screenplay writing.

Set in the background of KGB headquarters – Moscow – 3rd Main Directorate (Military

Counter-Intelligence) the screenplay starts with a conversation between the commanding officer and four other officers. Among them are DIMITRY IVANOV, a white male, handsome, in his 30’s and ANNA PETROVA, a white female, in her 30’s, very attractive lady.

On one side, there is an investigation whether one of their lieutenant Ewa Nowak is still alive, and on the other side, the mystery of Ewa being alive. On the other hand, there is Bogan and Kot who are illegally selling Gold cakes bought from Afghanistan.

The script reveals various sides of the characters, on one side Kot does illegal business, on the other hand, he donates money for the hospice. The script deals with complex characters and they make each part of the story interesting by creating suspense in the reader’s mind. I particularly loved the fact that the script has many sides, it has a  military background, it has a dark corner like the smuggling of Gold Cakes it has a good side of donating money to the hospital. Characters like Jarek and his recovery remain extremely suspicious. The way Ewa explained how she survived the crisis is the sign of her bravery.

The fact that the writer could create riveting tension at every sequence of the screenplay is praiseworthy. As human beings, we’re hard-wired to seek out answers to whatever questions are set before us. One of the best devices a writer has at their disposal is a well placed (unanswered) question. For example, let’s take into account the ending scene, it is not revealed that what caused the death of the person.  The trick is not to give away too much too soon.

Superior Being: Stardust has a  good plot that continues to raise new questions, even as old ones are answered, but throughout the story, I do not feel that the writer is trying to tie everything up in a neat bow at the end. Despite he has left a never-ending quest for resolution, a few loose ends can go a long way toward creating resonance with the readers.

Giving the audience an out, to me, is what makes a screenplay stick with me, and what makes me keep going back and replaying certain things over in my mind. Therefore, this screenplay can turn into an extraordinary movie if executed with care, patience, and expertise.

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