The Secret to Our Happiness is Found in Helping Others

A young Indian man receives a big tip and find that the secret to happiness is in giving.

Written and Directed by Anusha Srinivasan Iyer | Review by Triptayan Chatterjee

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dream can sacrifice itself for another dream, and therein lies the secret to our happiness. Anusha Srinivasan Iyer’s film “The World in My Dreams” reflects this sentiment.

The theme is woven throughout with a social message, bearing a simple but catchy storyline. Iyer’s five-minute film is an in-depth philosophical outlook on society and our regard for one another.

To that end, there’s no imposition of editing, no ultra work of VFX, or dramatic lighting. Instead, there’s the strong backbone of content that makes the film a unique one.

The script is pointed, aimed to teach us something about how we treat each other. And the screenplay is part of the necessity of the cinema. What’s more, the acting is not melodramatic, and the actor’s facial expression carries the heartfelt compassion of this wonderful film.

The Secret to Our happiness

As it turns out, “The World in My Dreams” is really a world about the sacrifice of fantasies in service to others.

Cinema is truly cinematic when its qualities catch our eyes and opens our heart.

Raju is a simple boy living in western India. He works in a small tea shop and serves tea all day long. His casual and joyful lifestyle turns into a dream when he gets awarded Rs. 500 from a stranger taking tea in her chauffeur-driven car.

A young man gets a big tip that sets off a fantasy where he wines and dines a beautiful woman. But is that the secret to our happiness?
Image via screenshot FilmFreeway

The generous tip sets off a dream before the young man’s eyes. He imagines an extravagant evening with a beautiful woman. Soon, his fantasy is interrupted by a child who comes to him asking for food.

It’s that sweet face and the child’s hunger that brings him back to reality. He suddenly snaps out of it and helps the hungry waif. Ultimately, our happy protagonist sacrifices his own dream for another’s need.

A struggle to fulfill a dream is nothing new to cinema. But sacrificing one’s desire to help another person is unique. Indeed, Iyer has not only brought an unusual storyline, but she has also successfully spread this social message through her film.

True Happiness Comes From Within

And if you spread the love, it makes you happier still.

A young man learns the true meaning of our happiness by sharing his good fortune with a hungry child.
Image via screenshot FilmFreeway

This Cult Critic movie Award winner, “The World in My Dream” is actually named SAPNE APNE APNE in Indian language. Regardless of its origin, the script of the film has successfully manifested a universal theme of kindness and compassion.

The shots and images are calculated, based upon the content of the film.  Not only the that but this budget minded, five-minute film also boasts excellent cinematography, which never takes away from its theme; but instead enhances our mood.

Adequate and apt lighting arrangement also works well, and the central character Raju is a vital and successful role in the film. This short film is more about cinematic language rather than mere storytelling.

From the very first scene where Raju cleans a glass, showing his face clarifies that Raju is discovering himself every moment and trying to understand his own evolution.

From my experience, cinema should always frame the actions of the actor. In the short film “The World of My Dreams,” Iyer follows the natural and universal rule of a successful cinema.


Triptayan Chatterjee

Triptayan is a filmmaker looking for a different horizon. Earlier a journalist Triptayan has done intensive research on film language and made different documentaries so far. He is now concentrating upon feature film in a vast landscape. Professionally a teacher, Triptayan has also passion for making films threaded with international and universal thoughts.

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